Q&A : CK Goldiing

In a world’s-first challenge, CK Goldiing, originally from Sheffield, arrived in London July 7 2015 with just £100, a bag of clothes and his camera. The presenter/photographer went on to provide 100 unsigned London musicians with stunning new press photos for their promotional efforts and Artists payed CK what they wanted.

Fast Forward to 2016 and CK has returned with a project called 'Vitae', a unique series of photographs that can be listened to, Inspired by a London-based singer-songwriter who broke down during coffee with CK. We caught up with CK to talk about his story, 100 Musicians, Vitae plus more!

 

You are launched an amazing project called Vitae, a project where photographs can be listened to, Where did the inspiration come from?

Thank you. The artsy answer is ‘it came from a place of deep internal refection’, but the honest answer is ‘it came from boredom’ – boredom with taking a photo, editing a photo, and posting it on instagram. Seriously, do that enough times, and eventually, you ask yourself, “so what, is this really all there is to you?” I grew tired of the predictable way we ‘consume’ photos, so the idea of expressing them beyond their traditionally visual state made me curious. I happen to be in the luxurious position of knowing dynamite singer-songwriters, none more so than Ivohe, so perhaps photography could be an audible experience, I wondered.


Ivohe's story is touching ad inspiring, as many musicians may deal with depression but we would never know - is this something you wish to document further after hearing Ivohe's story? 

I’ll never forget the day I rang her to say I wanted to share the project with fine platforms like Creative Conversations. I said, ‘we don’t have to actually reveal your ongoing battle with depression, we can just say we’ve created an audible photography thing’. I expected her to choose to keep her personal stuff private, but immediately, she said, ‘no, fuck it, everyone in London is fucking depressed… I hope my situation helps someone feel stronger and not alone.’ Ladies and gentlemen… I give you my buddy, WHAT A HERO!! To answer your question, yes, Ivohe and I are hungry to hear from anyone who shares the feelings expressed in the Vitae series – if nothing else, it would make us feel her tears weren’t in vain.

You've done previous projects such as #100Musicians - what was that experience like and how did it help with Vitae?

On the most fundamental level, if not for #100Musicians, I would never have met Ivohe – she was musician #83. On a more profound level, however, #100Musicians gave me a thirst for discovering, exploring and sharing human stories. 

You seem to always think outside of the box, as a Creative, What inspires you today?

What a question, ooh. Okay, right now, I’m mildly obsessed with Gary Vaynerchuck - an American entrepreneur behind a multi-million dollar digital media & marketing empire. Somehow, he’s managed to take the traditionally dreary subject of business, and made it into the most compelling online series you could imagine. His film crew document his daily endeavours, as he engages with clients, delivers speeches and sits in a taxi. I’m not doing a great job at selling his brand here, but honestly, the guy is a charisma machine, and what I respect most about him, is he is unashamedly himself: wearing Nike trainers, jeans and swearing like a builder at every given opportunity. Imagine taking Steve Jobbs’ business acumen, then adding Al Pacino’s charisma. That’s Gary Vee.

I know this has nothing to do with photography, but in truth, very little about ‘photography’ inspires me day-to-day. Day-to-day, I’m most inspired by humans making the most of their given talents.

When shooting photographs, what techniques do you use? 

oh, this question, ha, Is ‘no technique’ a technique? I’ve gone on record many times saying the mechanics of photography bore me, it’s the human interaction that excites me. A photographer friend started telling me about her new lens recently, and as she beamed, I could feel myself drifting off, thinking about KFC - I simply don’t share her love of kit, sorry, just no! I don’t think I’ve ever taken a photograph with a camera in my life… I instinctively take photos with empathy. Singer-songwriter Izzy Thomas and I were recently hanging out (in KFC, actually) when she said, “CK, you don’t shoot people, you shoot people’s souls.” I hugged her a bit. 

Ultimately, if someone leaves a photoshoot with me feeling like they’ve been on a photoshoot, I’ve failed.

You are a presenter, as well as a photographer, how do you balance the workload of both?

The two are more complimentary than you’d think. My years in radio and now events/online TV has taught me how to create engaging content. When you’ve presented music festivals to several thousand people and made them all laugh, it teaches you stuff. Take #100Musicians for example, that colossal six-month adventure played out via daily videos on my facebook page, and thanks to my presenting DNA, I had a head start in knowing how to deliver content in a fluid, coherent, engaging manner. I don’t see a huge difference between presenting and photography – let’s face it, at the heart of both disciplines, is positively connecting with human beings.

What does CK Goldiing have planned for the future?

CK Goldiing? How formal. Okay, I’ll take your lead and say I intend to develop my brand to the point where ‘CK Goldiing’ is a word people associate with authentic, honest, inspiring human stories. I’ve written three formats since #100Musicians, and I’m now engaging with production companies. Early November, I’ll be in London for a month, as I’ve found a great videographer who is keen to work with me on a mini docu-series I’ve written. It’s nothing to do with photography, incidentally, but everything to do with inspiring humans. It amazes me how much value is placed on celebrity culture nowadays. Don’t get me wrong, I love a Rihanna song, a TOWIE episode or a shallow gossip column as much as the next guy, but that vacuous garbage accounts for only 5% of the weekly content consumption. 

It’s now nine months since I completed #100Musicians, and still, people are so kind and generous in their memories of it, emailing me or telling me face-to-face what they loved about it. Anyone who knows me will know I don’t ever talk about #100Musicians unless someone asks me about it, so for people to still talk about it when they see me reassures me I’m on the right path.  

You can check out CK Goldiing's Creative Conversations, here.

Creative Conversations : Stanley Chow, Illustrator


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives under the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is illustrator, Stanley Chow from Manchester.


What inspired you most to become an Artist/Illustrator?

Not having to carry on the family business in running a Chinese takeaway was my inspiration… Not wanting to have a ‘real’ job. I knew from a very young age that I was pretty good at drawing and art… and I knew there was nothing that was going to get in my way in achieving my artistic ambitions. I have to say I was encouraged by my parents too, which is a rare thing being a second generation Chinese boy living in England.

You have created illustrations for big names such as The New Yorker, how has that been like? Is there a lot of pressure with big brands?

There used to be a pressure when I was younger, because you couldn't believe that these brands would want to use your work… It’s less so now because you get used to it I guess, as I'm pretty confident in my own abilities. Having said that.. there’s always pressure on you regardless of the size of the brand…I put pressure on myself to make sure I always do a good job and also never to miss a deadline. Admittedly not every job I’ve done has been great.. but I’ve never missed a deadline. But with the New Yorker, that was a huge deal… I knew I wanted to establish myself as a New Yorker illustrator when I was still at Art School… It was around 2008 when I got my first New Yorker commission.. I had to wait 4 years until I got my next one… but I’m pretty much a regular in the magazine, which is nice.

Since your time creating, What has been the best and worst thing you've learnt?

The best thing I’ve learnt is that the more hours you dedicate to creating, the better you become. You’re constantly learning whilst doing this job. The worst thing is that being a workaholic is that it’s incredibly hard to find the work-life balance, especially when you’re married with 2 kids.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through beforehand? 

To be honest with you, I can’t pinpoint particularly where I find inspiration… Inspiration I think is something that happens all around you in your day to day life… from silly things your kids say to seeing a pattern on someone’s jacket in a film you were watching on Channel 4 at 2 in the morning. I surround myself with pictures and books, I’m an Instagram addict and all these things help inspire me I guess.

There is a stigma that designers, animators, painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit for their craft and are sometimes 'forgotten' about? do you agree and why?

Admittedly it’s not something I’m too worried about nowadays. I’m just happy I got the job in the first place, get paid and then move onto the next commission. Most of the time,  the general public couldn’t give two shits about who did what and when… If someone wants to find out who illustrated, designed whatever, that person will go and discover for themselves who did it.  If you want to be recognised in your field, it should be your job to make yourself known, not somebody else’s. 

How did the idea for your illustrative style come about? Did you think it would be received so well?

My style came about because in the first 10 years of my career, nobody knew who I was or even cared, I wasn’t really happy with the illustrations I was producing, I was mainly producing work that I thought would help me find more work… disillusionment made me re-think my direction… I started learning how to use Adobe Illustrator, I started illustrating things that I liked and wanted to do, regardless of what other people thought and I discovered a new sense of freedom. I think it’s been quite well received, I guess I wouldn’t be doing this interview if it wasn’t.

What is your favourite Illustration or design from a purely creative point of view you've come across and why?

It’s probably the Fly TWA / New York Poster by David Klein. I love posters that combine both type and illustration. It’s something I’d like to do more of, which why I admire it so much. Also Klein has managed to recognisably illustrate Time Square with so much vibrancy by just using a series of abstract shapes and lines. He’s captured the essence of New York with so much simplicity

As a professional yourself, What advice do you have for young illustrators growing up today?

Illustrate the things you love and have an interest in, as why wouldn’t want to illustrate the things you love, I think it’s stupid to do anything else. (I have to say, when I was younger, I was stupid)… but also treat it like a job… you need to put the hours in, as it will make a better illustrator.

If you could pick one iconic design or illustration from Sport, music, movies or TV you wish you created yourself, which one would it be?

It’s not so much one iconic design, but there is one design ambition which I have yet to achieve and that’s to design the mascot for the World Cup or Olympic Games.

And finally, What have you got planned for the future or what can we expect?

I have no set plans for the future, just to carry on illustrating like I have done for the past 20 years for another 20 years and I would also say to lower your expectations. 

Follow Stanley Chow on Twitter Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date with Stanley's future projects or Visit his website on www.stanleychow.co.uk

Creative Conversations : Omar Momani, Cartoonist


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives under the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is Animator, Omar Momani from Jordan


What inspired you most to become an Animator/Cartoonist?

Mickey Mouse, Popeye, Tom & Jerry were my best friends during my early childhood, I used to watch their cartoons and thought that they were real until my parents informed me that they were just cartoons which were the inspiration to draw cartoons as I was fascinated by the idea of giving a life, soul and characters to cartoons.

You have worked for big names such as Goal international, How has that been like, is there a lot of pressure involved with big brands?

I am a MAD magazine fan and football fan at the same time and working for Goal provided me with the best opportunity to combine my love for both things (cartoons and football). At the beginning, the idea of working for an international website such as Goal was definitely intimidating given its broad and international audience. Clearly, the pressure was high as the audience's reaction to football cartoons was unpredictable and I was not accustomed with reading and receiving criticism and negative feedback.

Since your time creating, what has been the best and worst thing about it?

The best thing about drawing football cartoons is the fact that I get to draw about something that I am passionate about and that is very dynamic and challenging. However, one of its drawbacks is the footballers continuous change of hair styles which forces me to constantly alter their image.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work? Is there a process you go through beforehand?

Clearly I get the cartoon's idea from football's trending news and are inspired and influenced by current affairs, historical events, music, movies, fiction and so on. It is important to note that the development of the cartoon's idea is done in collaboration with Goal colleagues.

There is stigma that designers, animators, painters, illustrators etc don't get enough credit for their craft and are sometimes 'forgotten' about. Do you agree and why?

Yes, I agree that designers, animators, painters, illustrators, creators, do not get enough credit for their work. However, I wouldn't go as far as saying that they are forgotten about. In my opinion, people love cartoons but most of them do not pay much attention to their creator. In the cartoon industry, the cartoon is more famous than the cartoonist.

Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from your profession, are you a sports man?

I try to be a sports man but it is not working well with me. Maybe because I do not have enough free time. I like music, specially classic Rock. I am a big fan of Frank Zappa, David Bowie and Lou Reed. Sadly they all passed away.

What is your favourite Illustration or design from a purely creative point of view you've come across and why?

Popeye characters are always a favorite - They are creative and unique to me 

What advice do you have for young illustrators growing up today?

For those of you who want to be good illustrators it is important that you draw and practice and improve your skills on a daily basis. Equally beneficial is reading about the history of the cartoons in order to get acquainted with how the cartoon industry developed over time.

If you could pick one iconic design or Illustration from sport, music, movies or Television you wish you created yourself, which one would it be?

Popeye; The most magnificent “superhero”. I cherish him and all the other characters in the cartoon.

And finally, What have you got planned for the future?

I am planning to make a short animated movie and a comic book. Something aside from sports.

Follow Omar Momani on Twitter - Facebook and Youtube to keep up to date with Omar's future projects and Animations or Visit his website on www.omar-momani.com 

Creative Conversations : Dave Merrell, Illustrator


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives under the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is 39 year old Illustrator, Dave Merrell from Manchester.


What inspired you most to become an Artist/Illustrator?

It's something I've always loved doing. Illustrating is something I've always been obsessed with and fortunate enough to be be good at it. Being inspired by movie posters, video game covers, comic books and sport probably cover all the major factors of my work from subject to technique.

You have worked for big names such as Nike, Adidas, Nivea, ESPN, just to name a few, how has that been like, is there a lot of pressure?

Working with any client, not just major brand names, is something I handle as professionally as I can. I always come away having learned something new, which is also very important to evolving your knowledge and techniques. There is a lot of pressure, yes, but you can only do the job you're given in the time your given to do it, to the best of your ability. This often means finding the most efficient way round a problem without cutting corners.

Since your time creating, What has been the best and worst thing about it?

The best thing is being paid for doing something you love doing. The worst thing is the stress levels that come with tight deadlines.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through beforehand? 

There is always a process, without one you run around like a headless chicken, waving your arms in the air, achieving nothing - or maybe that's just me. I always start with research and gathering reference - this forms a solid foundation from where I start my sketches.

There is a stigma that designers, animators, painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit for their craft and are sometimes 'forgotten' about? do you agree and why?

I don't know about 'forgotten', there is still a lot of love out there for the craft. Although, I do find often people don't treat it as a serious career path. I've had comments like " All you do is draw pictures" and " I wish I could just sit there and draw all day" - I'd like to think I speak on behalf of most professional artists and illustrators when I say, there's a bit more to it than that. Like creative conception, composition, years of training and evolving different techniques, etc and don't get me started on the people who think you need their help to promote yourself by offering exposure instead of payment. Mini-rant over.

Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from your profession, are you a sports man?

I used to be very active, but now I'm normally sat in my studio with a pencil in my hand rather than on the pitch. I am also an award-winning toy designer.

What is your favourite painting or design from a purely creative point of view you've come across and why?

I love designer, Olly Moss's angle on his work, there's always something more beneath the surface of his designs. His ' Legend of Zelda ' is a great example. He produces work which you wish you'd thought of first. Like any good invention, really.

What advice do you have for young illustrators growing up today?

Be wary of people offering exposure instead of money. Evolve - never stay static. Try not to wait for the procession of feedback about your work, do your work, promote it, and move on to the next piece. You will get rejected - That's just one stone unturned. There are many stones to unturn. Always concentrate on your own work and be courteous and polite about other peoples work. Always be honest.

If you could pick one iconic design or illustration from music, movies or TV you wish you created yourself, which one would it be?

There's a bunch of Drew Struzan posters I wish I'd created - although very difficult to choose a favourite, I'd have to go with the poster from the 1982 version of The Thing. Purely because of the story behind the design process. In a nutshell, he had 24 hours to come up with the concept, design and execution of the artwork - which even by today's standards would be deemed unrealistic. 

And finally, What has Dave Merrell got planned for the future?

I plan to venture into more than just sports illustration and to acquire an illustration agent, feel free to get in touch

Follow Dave Merrell on Twitter - Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date with Dave's future projects or Visit his website to purchase Art on www.davemerrell.com

Creative Conversations : Mathew Vieira, Artist


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives under the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is Artist Mathew Vieira from West Sussex.


What inspired you most to become an Artist?

Simply the pure joy I would receiving from drawing and painting. When I was younger, I loved cartoons as much as any other kid and I would constantly practice drawing my favourite characters. 

Everyone is different, so How would you describe your artistic style ?

My style seems to develop with every painting, there are a few consistent traits which can be seen in each portrait such as bold brush marks, visible under layers and construction lines. Some people have suggested an urban, cubism, realism mixture which I can kind of agree with. I like to try new things with each piece of work and see what happens. Right now I’m enjoying the palette knife and applying thick paint.

Since your time creating, What has been the best and worst thing about it?

The best thing is the excitement of starting a new painting, there’s nothing like staring at a blank canvas and pouring out your images which fly around in your mind. The worst is when you hit a block, it feels like nothing you do is working and you are a terrible artist, doubt likes to say hello, but the beauty of this is that if you continue you will persevere and find your rhythm again.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through beforehand?

I tend to paint portraits of the people who inspire me, I appreciate the hard work and dedication these people have given to their respected profession and I apply this to my work. Following artists whose work you enjoy is always a great source of inspiration and also just talking to people, gathering stories.

There is a stigma that designers, animators, painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit for their craft and are sometimes 'forgotten' about? do you agree and why?

I do think that the arts can be very undervalued and almost dismissed in some cases. A lot of people don’t understand the time and effort artists put into their work, all they see is the end result and a “big” price tag but when you learn that something has taken years of practice and weeks or even months to create it all becomes a bit more clear.

Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from your profession, You've created paintings of Skepta and Wretch 32, are you a big music man?

Yes definitely, I love to listen to music whilst I paint and artists such as skepta, wretch 32, Wiley and a whole host of others have helped me develop my work through their music. Growing up in London the whole Grime scene was and still is a major part of London’s culture, and something that many people can familiarise with.

Another fun fact is that I have a metal pole in my left leg! I broke my leg in 2013 after being hit by a motorcycle and a day has gone by since where I am not thankful for the life I have and the people in it. This incident gave me a real reality check and made me think about my priorities in life. I am now happy to say that I have my daughter, my
fiancée and my home.

 

What is your favourite Painting or Illustration from a purely creative point of view you've come across and why?

There have been so many incredible portrait artists, Lucien Freud, Rembrandt, Euan Uglow and many more, but what really gets me motivated and has captured my imagination are the portraits of some contemporary artists such as Andrew Salgado, Tim Okamura, Colin Davidson, Aaron Nagel etc. The work these artists are creating are fresh and so bold and in tune with today’s world. If I had to pick one painting it would have to be “reflection” by Lucian Freud, this has always been a painting that I constantly go back to for inspiration.

What advice do you have for young illustrators and Artists growing up today?

Keep working, never stop. Sometimes it may seem that you are getting nowhere with your artwork, but you never know who is watching. Get your work out there, show the world, it would be a waste to have all your work hidden.

If you could pick one iconic Art or illustration from Sport, music, movies or TV you wish you created yourself, which one would it be?

I wish I had created the original star wars movie posters, they are just legendary.

And finally, What have you got planned for the future?

From the 1-3 July 2016 I will be at the Childwickbury Arts Festival with Kraken Creative doing some live painting with an incredible group of artists. Also keep an eye out for my series of digital portraits for the Euros this summer.

Follow Mathew Vieira on Twitter - Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date with future projects and designs or to purchase Art - Visit his website on www.mathewvieira.com

Creative Conversations : Anjelica Roselyn, Illustrator


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives under the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is Womenswear Illustrator, Anjelica Roselyn from London.


What inspired you most to become an Illustrator and designer?

It’s something I have always loved doing and have been involved with illustrating or designing for as along as can remember. After graduating in Womenswear from London College of Fashion I took time to pursue illustration a little more.

Since your time creating, What is the best and worst thing about designing?

The best thing is just doing what you love and doing what comes naturally to you. On top of that, sharing your work and getting a great response is awesome. The worst thing has to be running out of inspiration at any time. If you’re not inspired there is nothing to create.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your illustrations, Is there a process you go through? 

Yes imagery is everything to me. There isn't a strict process I go through but magazines, editorials, Tumblr, Instagram, are all part of my process. Of all that I especially love looking at fashion photography, editorials or campaigns for inspiration. I usually look for an image or story has a particular energy that I can connect with.

There is a stigma that painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit for their hard-work and are often marginalised, do you agree and why?

For sure, there’s two sides to the creative industry - those who create and understand that process and those who try to exploit you for it. I think from all levels of being an artist, you will experience people who are overly enthusiastic about your creative work but never wish to appropriately pay or compensate you. I think this is where creatives have to band together to demand respect which in my opinion, is severely lacking in this industry.

Fashion plays a big role in your life, how has that driven your passion for art and illustration?

Fashion has been part of my life for so long I don’t remember being without it or not interested in it. My interpretation of fashion so far is something very feminine and fun and I think that is portrayed through my illustrations. I don’t take fashion so seriously to the point where I let it govern how I work or the style of my work. In my opinion it should be a positive experience and I try to go with that premise. 

What is your favourite illustration from a purely creative point of view and why?

I love anything with colour with oil pastel or texture. There's a sitting series I did a few months ago of Jean Campbell that I adore. 

What advice do you have for young designers and illustrators like yourself growing up in 2016?

Just keep going! Keep looking for inspiration and continue growing. With anything in the art industry, the key is being yourself and having a distinct style. If you don’t have it yet, try to discover it through experimentation - there’s something unique to everyone’s art.

And finally, What has Anjelica got planned for the future?

Too many things to tell at the moment! Mainly, I look forward to growing as an artist.

Follow Anjelica Roselyn on Twitter - Tumblr and Instagram to keep up to date with her future projects and designs or to purchase Art Visit her website on www.anjelicaroselyn.com

Creative Conversations : Kevin McGivern, Illustrator


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives under the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is 35 year old Artist, Kevin McGivern from Glasgow.


What inspired you most to become an Artist?

I have been drawing for as long as I can remember and growing up, my dad was a hobbying artist drawing landscapes and vintage cars. The first time I realised that you could actually make pictures for a living was seeing the posters Drew Struzan created for the Star Wars movies. He has since gone on to be one of my biggest artistic influences. Norman Rockwell and Haddon Sundblom are also huge influences.

You have worked for big names such as Disney and Marvel, what was that like?

Honestly, my process for working with big companies like Disney and Marvel is pretty much the same as for a small indie publisher or film maker. I always want to do any job to the best of my ability and I try not to think of the huge corporation at the other end of the email.

Since your time creating, What is the best and worst thing about being an artist?

I absolutely love my life and 99% of the things that come along with being a freelance illustrator. I love the fact that I never have that Sunday night feeling of “Urrrghh…I have work tomorrow”. Being able to create for a living is just the best. And being able to work with a variety of clients in a variety of industries means that no day is ever the same. For the worst thing, I would have to say that working from home, you never are “away from work”. There is always that guilty feeling that I should be working. Also, it can be quite lonely at times and in the future I may share a studio with other artists. Podcasts and Youtube are my best friends! 

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through? 

A lot of the inspiration comes from the clients. Usually, they have a good idea of what they are looking for. For my personal work, I am inspired by everything you can imagine, books, movies, architecture, clothing, other artists….the list goes on. Pinterest is also a godsend when looking for inspiration. My process is to do a couple of rough sketches. Once the preferred sketch is chosen, I look up reference images on Pinterest, Google or wherever. I also take my own reference photos. I often pose myself or friends/family member in specific lighting conditions. There are always things that you notice that you never would if you were drawing everything from your head. I then do a tighter drawing and then on to the final painting.

A lot of animators, designers, painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit? do you agree and why.

A problem with working in a creative industry is that the general public think that it’s easy and a large percentage undervalue to work. The number of requests I have to do work for free or to illustrate a movie poster for $50, is unbelievable. There is no way the same people would approach a plumber or tiler in the same way, so why for artists? (Rant over).

Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from your profession?

I lived in Greece for 8 years and can speak Greek.

What is your favourite painting or caricature from a purely creative point of view and why?

Usually, my favourite painting is the most recent one I completed. I am my own worst critic and for me the older a painting gets, the worse it gets. At the moment, my favourite would have to be “Jealousy”. I think it succeeds best in the storytelling aspect and atmosphere I wanted to create. I’m also a fan of using negative space and I think it works well here.

What advice do you have for young artists growing up in 2016?

Probably the same as every other artist would say..draw, draw, draw!! A lot of artists worry about finding their style. This happens naturally the more you draw. Also keep being inspired by other artists. Gradually as you draw and paint, certain aspects of what you like in other peoples work will come through in yours in your own unique way. 

And finally, What have you got planned for the future?

My plan for the future is to keep on freelancing. I would love to work more in the book cover industry and do some more gallery shows. I would also love to work some more on self-initiated work with the end goal being some kind of book or story. 

Follow Kevin McGivern on Twitter - Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date with Kevin's future projects or Visit his website on www.kevinmcgivern.com 

Creative Conversations : Erina Nyonyintono, Artist


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives behind the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is 25 year old Painter, Erina Nyonyintono from Reading.


What inspired you most to become an Artist?

I have always had a creative nature which started as a child.  My Dad was an architect so I would see him drawing by hand long before the days of CAD (Computer Aided Design) and my siblings and we would often spend hours drawing and colouring in to entertain ourselves.  I'm quite old fashioned and prefer to work away from computer screens, I tend to just zone out with my music playing and paint.

Since your time creating, What is the best and worst thing about being an artist?

The best thing has got to be creative freedom, in art there are no right or wrongs. It's just a matter of putting pen to paper and converting the colours and ideas you have in your mind into something physical.  The worst thing is probably creative block when you're lost in where the piece is going, at which point I just have to leave it completely and go and make myself some tea lol. I just have faith that it will come together in the end and keep at it.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through?

First and foremost I would say that I'm most heavily inspired by nature and the seasons. I'm originally a country girl so I love being out and about when it isn't freezing cold :o/.  Then whilst at work I spend a lot of time looking at design blogs such as designboom, design taxi and creativebloq, in addition to browsing other artists social media pages, illustrators and graffiti artists. And finally from time to time i'll check out art exhibitions of interest that are on.  

Alot of painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit for their hard-work, do you agree and why?

I'd say that this is 50:50.  A lot of people I come across appreciate art and the time it takes but I would say that it's a little frustrating when others say "I wish i was born with a talent, you're so lucky".  Personally I don't see myself as lucky or born with a gift at all.  Just like anyone with a hobby, I spend countless hours that people don't see behind closed doors practicing - when others choose to watch television or pursue their different interests. 

Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from art?

I've been learning Spanish since late 2014 with the intent to travel around Central America and improve my language skills further in 2017.

What is your favourite painting from a purely creative point of view and why?

I can't say that I have a specific favourite painting. But I love artists such as Degas, Voka, Jackson Pollock and Van Gogh. 

What advice do you have for young artists like yourself growing up in 2016?

Don't stop creating and don't create art to try and please people - do it for yourself.  A lot of what you create you may consider trash at the time, but keep at it because when you look back over the months you will be able to appreciate your growth and development even if you may not see it in the current moment!

And finally, What does the future hold for yourself?

As of April I've gone part time at my current job as a Graphic Designer so that I have more time to pursue my art goals, that said I would love to be a full time artist by this time next year!  I'm hoping to take part in another exhibition within London before 2016 ends. Furthermore, I've also got my sights set on getting my artwork onto restaurant walls and/or bars, hopefully with it ending up in chain along the lines of Chimichanga etc.

Follow Creative Curls on Twitter - Facebook and Instagram for more updates of her work or you can check out more paintings or purchase her Artwork via www.creativecurls.co.uk 

Creative Conversations : Gary Alford, Painter


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives behind the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is 35 year old Painter, Gary Alford from Shoreditch.


What inspired you most to become a painter and create artwork?

I have always enjoyed drawing and painting and I wanted to make this my way of life, of earning. Artwork, music and creative life and people are vital to me.

You've created artwork for legends such as Wu Tang Clan, How does that feel? Is there a lot of pressure? 

It's fantastic to be able to name some of the people I have worked with. An honor and something I should congratulate myself on. There is a lot of pressure from the clients side as they expect everything done extremely quickly but the main pressure is the one I put on myself. I want everything to look the best it possibly can. This was particularly the case when working on RZAs Bobby Digital Digi Snacks album artwork. I was unhappy with the outcome for a long time as I thought it could have been a lot better but as time has passed, I am happier with it. 

Who would you rank as the best person you've worked with in terms of creativity?

I have worked with so many inspirational artists it is difficult to say. The UK team of musicians and poets and creatives I have around me that I am lucky to call friends as well impress me daily: Triple Darkness, Flowtecs, The Life and Death, Giusi Tomasello, TCG, Sinister Stricken is crazy talented. For work flow and vision my man Ringz Ov Saturn who plays the role of music producer, editor, documentary and promo video maker just does my head in wondering how he fits it all into one life. Kudos ! 

Since your time creating, What is the best and worst thing you've come across?

The best thing is working with the people that inspired me in youth and present day. Making that connection. That includes Smif N Wessun's General Steele, RZA, Dom PaChino, Kinetic9 and many more. The worst thing has to be constantly coming across people who expect artwork to be free or next to nothing and unfortunately that's about 80% of the offers I get

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through? 

Listening to music gets my mind ticking. The best way to get inspiration is to not wait until you receive a divine thought from the heavens, you could be waiting a while, but to just start the ball rolling and get working. Your first stubborn scratchings will lead to the inspiration flowing.

A lot of Designers, painters, illustrators, creators, don't get enough credit? do you agree and why?

I'm not sure if I do agree or don't. I guess it's down to each individual case as I can't determine an answer in a broad perspective. In my field of hand to canvas painting the artists name is always attached. People search out the art under a particular artists name. In street art the artists moniker is written in big letters on the piece or the work is instantly recognisable as THAT artists piece. Think the trademark characters of Stik's murals. Music producers are commonly named along with the vocal artist and promo directors are more commonly credited at the beginning of a video. Rightly so.

And finally, What advice do you have for the new generation of Creatives?  

Keep on, do lots. Keep an eye on but mainly ignore what your contemporaries are doing so as not to mold your path too much. Listen to advice for interest but follow what's in your heart more.

Follow Gary's future projects on Facebook and Instagram and be sure to keep up to date with paintings and artwork and to purchase Art via www.garyalfordart.com

Creative Conversations : Leopold Albert, Photographer


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives behind the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the world today. Next up on the series is 24 year old Photographer, Leopold Albert from Essex.


What inspired you most to do photography?

For me it came about because I wanted to try and create a vision for my brand. When you don't have photographers at hand you have to get to grips with your project and try new things. I researched other photographers to see what styles I like then tried to replicate it. I know it sounds bad but that's how you have to try and approach these things because during that process you will develop your own style without even knowing. I want to capture a moment and share it with people or take a set of photos for people to get the feel of whats going on.

You have started GRLSa platform celebrating creative women, what has that been like? 

To be honest, very up and down. I feel the idea is good just needs some refining which I'm working on but I still see a lot of potential in it. When I first came up with the idea there wasn't much around but now you have the likes of the Cream Soda Girls, Public Ambition and High Content doing similar things. I don't see it as competition but a realisation that there are others on the same wavelength and it just makes creating content more interesting. It has defiantly helped me to improve my photography because by shooting regularly, you know what to improve on every time.

Since you've started doing photography. What has been the best and worst thing?

Best thing so far is that you meet loads of good people and the only bad thing I can say is weather and location can mess it up for you.

Where or how do you find inspiration for your work, Is there a process you go through? 

For me everyday without fail since maybe when I started University. I have always checked a blog whether its Hyperbeast or Highsnobiety, I have been looking at images everyday so it kind of builds a framework in my mind. I have a folder that I just drag and drop inspiration into and I check that often too. When it comes down to a shoot I normally create a smaller folder with more concentrated images or a mood-board because sometimes, flicking through photos, you can forget so when it's in a mood-board, you get a general feel and work from that

How would you describe your photography style? 

I try to make my subject look real as possible because its very easy now in our culture to slap a filter on and say your a photographer. If I have to edit, I want people to understand why and see I'm trying to give them a package or a feeling. Film is also something that I'm picking up now because I know if I can grasp that then when I take photos digitally, it will make me better because I have gone back to the basics of it. 


You have a passion for music and fashion, how has that helped in photography?

Music is always good because if your on a shoot with a nervous model, then they can be a lot easier to work with if you play things they like and it creates a mood. Fashion mainly helps with composition of my photos and how the overall look should be and I feel that's very important.

Alot of photographers, designers, illustrators, don't get enough credit, do you agree and why?

I feel that's an issue with a lot of things but in terms of photography right now in London it's getting a lot of credit. Vicky Grout and Ashley Verse have been putting in work over the past year or so and they are on to big things. Also my guys at High Roller who have helped me out with my brand and GRLS are onto some good things too. Maybe bigger companies don't look at what we are trying to do but eventually I feel the credit will come. 


What advice do you have for young photographers growing up in 2016?

I'm gonna list it because I can't say it in a paragraph but here goes:

Intern till you can't intern no more.

Try and shoot something everyday

Don't blame your equipment ( people are shooting a madness on iphones )

Study the craft and research

What have you got planned for the future?

This year I want to push GRLS more. I have been talking about doing an exhibition or show of some sort for ages so maybe looking to get that idea down. Obviously new clothes from Leopold Albert and an even bigger push in that because that is what got me into doing all these other things.

And finally, Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from your profession?

I challenge anyone to try and beat me at NBA 2k15/16 - apart from that, everything I do nowadays is linked to my profession. 

Follow Leopold on Twitter and be sure to keep up to date with GRLS via www.grlsmag.com and future Leopold Albert projects on : www.leopoldalbert.co.uk

Creative Conversations : Rahana Dariah, Illustrator


Creative Conversations is a new feature series focused on shining a light on creatives behind the radar. We aim to have 'creative conversations' with some of the most innovative creatives in the country today. We kick off the series with 25 year old Illustrator, Rahana Dariah from London.


What inspired you most to become an illustrator?

Well I've always been above average in art from a young age and I knew it was something I wanted to do, in my teens i loved fashion illustration and designing outfits and that's when i became seriously interested in becoming a fashion designer but after studying fashion and clothing for two years at college I decided it wasn't for me as i hated making clothes and loved drawing more, so i decided illustration was where it was at for me.

What is the best and worst thing about illustration?

The worst thing about illustration is probably people thinking you could do stuff for free or people thinking your work is too expensive, when I spend all night awake drawing something and working hard on a piece it comes at a price. The best thing about illustration for me is getting to do what I love and getting paid for it and also getting to see your completed piece and just sitting there thinking "I did that".

Where do you find inspiration for your work?

I find inspiration everywhere, I could be watching a movie or listening to music and it would put me in a certain mood to produce whatever i'm feeling at the time, but I do listen to alot of music and it does help inspire me, i'm also big on black history and i love looking up African art, i just love the patterns and the colours and the cultures.

What have you got planned for the future?

I've got huge plans for the future but it will take alot of willpower and money, but for the near future I'm focusing on getting myself around the world and illustrating whilst travelling.

 

Many designers, painters and illustrators don't get enough credit? Do you agree?

Oh of course there's so many creatives not getting the recognition they deserve, some of them work so hard and try to get themselves out there especially those in not quite developed countries, it's sad but they give me such a drive to work hard.

What advice do you have for young illustrators?

Keep drawing and keep a portfolio of all your work. All the good and bad drawings or paintings will come in handy later on. Also, experiment as much as you can.

And finally, Give us one interesting fact about yourself away from Illustration?

I love languages and i'm striving to become a polyglot.

Follow Rahana on Twitter and be sure to keep up to date with her future projects and latest illustrations on : www.cargocollective.com/rahanabanana